I have to wave a red flag for a common mistake people make when they start out with affiliate marketing, which is a waste of time if you ask me. In many cases you may start out with an affiliate marketing training program to get the basic “know hows” to get started. These programs (listed in the article above about affiliate marketing training) are charging you a monthly fee to take part in their education.
Where there is money to be made, there are people that are trying to take advantage of others though.   That is the unfortunate part of the business world.   However, not all companies operate their business in this way and there are a lot of “shining stars” within the affiliate marketing world and people that truly care, that push the industry in a positive direction, and then continue to work to evolve and truly help folks within this space.

Description of system: The program was made by Michael Brown, a person who once designed one of the best affiliate marketing systems I’ve ever tried: Niche Blitzkrieg. I actually rated that one 8 out of 10 stars, but that was because it was a little bit cheaper than this new one. Unfortunately, that program died out and he moved into Niche60, but the guy is legit as is his training.
Many of the ads you see online are created by marketers who are paid each time you click on their ad. And if that click takes you to a website where you sign up to try a product or you make a purchase, the marketer may get paid even more. These are affiliate marketers. They are hired by the owner of the product to promote it on social media, on websites, and through email. Sometimes networks of affiliate marketers negotiate the rate marketers will get paid per click, per sign-up to try the product, and per purchase. Everyone from the merchant to the affiliate marketers gets a cut. And all these people may be tracking you, too, just from that one first click.
Fortunately there are many folks out there that are standing up to this kind of behavior and helping others avoid these types of programs. My suggestion is to always do your due diligence before you invest your money online, in particular if you are entering into the opportunity world and the company is not up front about what their product actually is.
So today, I’d like to to give you 5 legitimate programs that are active and working today, that you can join and be confident in knowing that they’ll work for you. Of course, it needs to be mentioned that you have to work hard with whichever one you choose, because without that, you may as well just save your money and time and not get involved with it. 
Creating a unique tracking ID for an Amazon link is easy. Simply log in to your Amazon affiliate dashboard, click “Account Settings” at the very top on the right, then click “Manage Tracking IDs”. From there you can make a new tracking ID so you can track which web page/campaign sold what.  You can learn more about using Amazon’s Tracking IDs here.
Yes is the short answer. Any time you are planing on generating money, you should have a plan. No plan means no real focus. There may be some 1/1000 percent of a chance you will succeed, but I haven't met them yet. If you have already started and have generated an income, record how. Doing so will give you material for use in expanding your business faster.
The cost of Five Figure Niche Site are really up there and so it sounds like the training is superb which is what I would hope for that much money. I’ve recently gotten into something else called Making Sense of Affiliate Marketing and I haven’t gotten through all the training yet, but what it does teach so far is pretty good. Of course nothing can beat Wealthy Affiliate though. Do you know of anyone who’s been successful with those other Affiliate Marketing programs?
Not all “free books” or “free ebooks” are scams by any means, but there are a lot that I have seen over the years that are free hard cover books that offer free shipping. They seem to have gained popularity once again and this scheme relies heavily on up-selling people, auto-payments, and/or luring them into some very high ticket mentoring, mastermind, or conference programs.
The phrase, "Affiliates are an extended sales force for your business", which is often used to explain affiliate marketing, is not completely accurate. The primary difference between the two is that affiliate marketers provide little if any influence on a possible prospect in the conversion process once that prospect is directed to the advertiser's website. The sales team of the advertiser, however, does have the control and influence up to the point where the prospect either a) signs the contract, or b) completes the purchase.

While affiliate marketing does take a lot of effort, the basic skills required are really simple to catch on to, and by learning them, you could start earning real money in a fairly short period of time. If you find a product niche you’re passionate about, you could even earn money by simply expressing your genuine love for a product you believe in, and feel good knowing you’re sharing your experience with others who will love the product as well.
No, because there are way more good, honest affiliate marketers than bad. And it’s actually gotten better. There’s more awareness today among merchants than there was when I first started, which has helped to clean things up quite a bit. The problem is there’s still a little of this attitude in the industry of looking the other way when the numbers are really good. As long the merchants are satisfied the affiliates seem to be bringing them a lot of traffic,  networks and program managers are still willing to suspend belief sometimes about where all that traffic is really coming from — because they’re making money too. At our trade shows, the sites with the most abuse going on are like the cool kids. They’re the ones throwing the big parties, because they’re making the most money and other people want in on that. But I’d argue that attitude gives the whole industry a black eye.
From the affiliate side, not only is the coupon market already saturated, it’s almost impossible to compete against super coupon affiliates such as retailmenot.com in organic search. If you don’t have paid placement budget, then how are you going to get found? Facebook? Maybe. But I doubt you’ll get the volume you need in order to drive enough sales through performance marketing to earn a living relying strictly on Facebook as a coupon affiliate.

Affiliate managers also consider the amount of effort needed to find and convert that customer for the merchant. For example did they have a huge following they actively reached out to? Did they create an app that had an affiliate tracking link inside? Did a lot of programming or design need to be put into the effort? Is the sales strategy legitimate and fair? Or did they take five minutes to slap a code together and have results show up for trademark plus terms in the search engines? These are all things a good affiliate manager needs to consider.


Thank you Yuwanda for this encouragement and information! My website is nowhere near finished yet but another blogger had recommended starting to get affiliate approval as soon as possible so I gave 2 of them a shot and was turned down today – but then stumbled upon your great post so I think it was all meant to be. I feel like it takes a lot of failures to achieve a small amount of success so this is just helping me to get to there… but patience is sometimes hard. I appreciate your excellent words of wisdom.
“It took me about six months to make my first affiliate sale, and my first affiliate sale was worth about $35,” Miki says. This blogger went on to say, “I didn’t make my first dollar until I decided to invest in the “Making Sense of Affiliate Marketing” course. Taking an affiliate marketing course was the best decision I ever made because I had no idea how much money I was leaving on the table. This course taught me the exact strategies to make money with affiliate marketing.”
While affiliate marketing does take a lot of effort, the basic skills required are really simple to catch on to, and by learning them, you could start earning real money in a fairly short period of time. If you find a product niche you’re passionate about, you could even earn money by simply expressing your genuine love for a product you believe in, and feel good knowing you’re sharing your experience with others who will love the product as well.
The easiest way to find out the legitimacy of any affiliate program or training course is to Google it. If it's a well known scam, you will more than likely see reports about it online. If you can't tell just by searching for the name, try searching for variations, such as "[affiliate program name] scam" or "[affiliate program name] ripoff." You can also search for "[affiliate program name] reviews," etc. 
Pat doesn't know shit about affiliate marketing. He got famous by pretending he runs successful "niche websites". Let's check out some growth - Last month he made $4,675.56 off his "niche websites". If we rewind to june 2010, he made $2,172.00 from niche websites - in terms of growth, over 7 years - that's shit. Pat makes most of his money "teaching you to be successful". In terms of affiliate marketers who make good coin, he is small time.
CPS, also referred to as PPS (Pay Per Sale), is a low-risk, high-profit, revenue-sharing model used by marketers to lure an unlimited number of new customers to their product or service. Cost-Per-Sale pays a set commission to the affiliate marketer who refers a lead that results in a purchase. Marketers love the CPS model since they only pay a commission after they get paid first by the purchasing customer. It’s in essence free marketing and advertising since the affiliate is the one who produces the lead without any up-front cost to them. This is also why CPS payout commission percentages are so high. Incidentally, the CPS model is primarily what we focus on here at highpayingaffiliateprograms.com.
I understand where you're coming from. It can be difficult to tell which ones are legit and which ones aren't. My rule of thumb is if it sounds too good to be true, then it probably is. I also check a website and its product's online reputation. There are all sorts of forums and review sites that can help you find out if a company and its products are the real deal or not.
Also, it really depends on who you ask. In any business, you will see people that are doing really well and people that aren’t. Their results depend on so many variables, including the business that they are engaged in, the number of years they have been in it, the age when they started, how much their initial investment was, were they mentored, etc.
Also known as a publisher, the affiliate can be either an individual or a company that markets the seller’s product in an appealing way to potential consumers. In other words, the affiliate promotes the product to persuade consumers that it is valuable or beneficial to them and convince them to purchase the product. If the consumer does end up buying the product, the affiliate receives a portion of the revenue made.
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