Your story with online marketing / affiliate marketing is a lonely but shared experience. What i mean is that when you are clueless as to how to make a real online income you fall into desperation and despair and feel so alone in the wold of affiliate marketing. But its also an experience thousands of us share as we struggle to find how to stay successful online and to learn what that actually means.
what a great article to great for a noobie just getting into affiliate marketing. Personally I have almost fell into an MLM, but before I make a decision on anything I usually talk to the people around me for advice. They immediately told me it would be very difficult to actually make money from it and it could be a scam so I never did it, and I’m glad! Overall, awesome article and I will share it with my friends. Have a great one Kyle.
I basically just stumbled on Wealthy Affiliate a few years ago, and only since then have I found out about all the other programs that are out there. Some of these other programs you review look interesting, and definitely like things I would have tried out at the beginning of my work-from-home research. But so many things keep me at WA now, including the price, and the hosting package.
So, now it’s time for me to answer the questions. Let’s start from the first one. Of course, you can make money with affiliate marketing. “Is affiliate marketing a scam?“. No, it’s not. It’s just one the many ways you can use to monetize your website/blog and it’s one of the most popular ways to make money online. If people couldn’t make money with affiliate marketing it wouldn’t be so popular. 
Second, there is no money in them giving away their book.  They will set up shipping at a price point that covers the cost of publishing their books.  They are going to use your mailing information and your contact details to present you with other offers.  Often times these are in the $1,000’s.  Often times there are instant upsells and OTO (one time offers) as well.

Yeah, the pyramid schemes out there are getting better at masking themselves as something else. When you join a program with the sole intention to recruit others into the very same program, followed by them doing the same person then you might be involved in a pyramid program or something that is pyramid like. The Affiliate Marketing is far removed from the idea of being a pyramid, but there are companies claiming they are affiliate marketing companies that are not operating that way. Just be careful.
13. FlexoffersFlexOffers.com is a premiere affiliate network that builds mutually profitable relationships between strategic, skilled, and trustworthy online publishers and a robust portfolio of 5,000+ popular advertisers spanning all verticals. With over 10+ years of experience in the affiliate marketing industry, they offer unparalleled customer service, an array of optimized data delivery tools, and fast and dependable payments proving that flexibility is the key to affiliate success. FlexOffers.com was recently ranked the eighth overall affiliate network in the Revenue+Performance Top 20 Affiliate (CPS) Network 2015 Blue Book survey.
Once you've protected your prospecting pool, maximize your affiliate program by working with the best and leaving the rest. As the old 80/20 adage implies, most of your revenue will come from a very small percentage of your affiliates. Because it can be time-consuming to manage a larger affiliate network, consider selecting only a few companies initially, and interview them before signing them on. Affiliates are an extension of your sales force and represent your online brand, so choose partners carefully.
Niche-specific challenges: It’s relatively easy to create content for the “tech how-to” niche (like “how to install Windows” or “how to use WinRar) - you just need a screencasting software and a microphone. For niches like DIY plumbing, however, you need significant time, energy and skills. This often compels marketers to flood the easier niches, increasing competition.
Without hesitation (after some research), I bought her course. As an aside, I’m not one of those people who buys any and every thing that comes down the pike. I’ve bought enough online products that DIDN’T work that it takes a lot for me to shell out money. I’m pretty good at figuring out stuff, but the more I researched Michelle, the more impressed I was by her and her course.
Affiliate Marketing is process of promoting someone else’s product in exchange for the commission. These can be digital or physical products and there are literally 10,000’s of affiliate programs (free to join) and MILLIONS of products that you can promote as an affiliate. It in essence allows you to enter any niche/vertical online and creating a business within it, without ever having to carry any inventory, deal with shipping, returns, or support for the actual product.
Other than being TRUTHFUL about the service/ad they are selling, when a FB page/person/blogger posts a link, are they required to tell their customers that they are an affiliate marketer? Or can they just post the link? For example, can a person who has a fan base say," I love this product, you can find it here: (then posts an affiliate link)" OR do they have to reveal on that FB/Twitter post that it's an affiliate link?
My point I wish to make & and illustrated by you. Is that there is legit & illegitimate opportunity out there in “ALL” businesses / opportunities. As a very proud networker marketer, yes I will name my company, MaxInternational. I thoroughly researched the company & its science, and the how & why we bring to the world our brand of scientifically proven products.

As a course developer and promoter, I can say that on the face of of it, promoting can be easier than developing one. The upside of development though, is that once it’s done, have to do is keep it updated and it can earn you money for years. That’s the case with my SEO copywriter training course, which I’ve been teaching (and earning from) since 2009.
Good question and sorry to hear you are one of the thousands who’ve been affected. Some people have moved out of state to other locations they are free to promote products in. Others simply pick and chose merchants who work with affiliates regardless of their location. This means you still do have earning potential with merchants who want to work with affiliates in all locations. I wonder if those merchants could stipulate more clearly who they are…. I’ll think about how I can communicate that more. The other way is to create your own product or service and sell it online. There is still money to be made in that arena as well. Finally, if you’re really stuck on the affiliate site of things, you can also look to make money through google adsense or through sponsored listings if you have a site that generates enough targeted traffic. Don’t give up if this is a dream. You will find a way to make it work if you really want to 🙂
Designed to create a huge amount of traffic at all times, these sites focus on building an audience of millions. These websites promote products to their massive audience through the use of banners and contextual links. This method offers superior exposure and improves conversion rates, resulting in a top-notch revenue for both the seller and the affiliate.
I understand where you're coming from. It can be difficult to tell which ones are legit and which ones aren't. My rule of thumb is if it sounds too good to be true, then it probably is. I also check a website and its product's online reputation. There are all sorts of forums and review sites that can help you find out if a company and its products are the real deal or not. 

I really hope affiliate marketing is not dead. I feel it is essentail for affiliates to lobby their merchants to say that 1. toolbars are unfairly hijacking their commissions and 2. don’t the merchants realise that the toolbars will cause them to lose thousands of links from affiliates who drop them and cause direct visits to merchants’ websites to become affiliate sales.

I think I'm missing a lot of points. Maybe I'm a tough sell but how the heck do I create compelling content for these promotions when I would never buy one? You'll probably say something like I need to pick a niche I'm interested in but I've tried that. I've gone down the categories list in ClickBank and the one's I have a slight interest in, either the product barely fits or crap quality.


For instance, five years ago this forum was absolutely packed with super successful affiliate marketers and product creators and list builders and there was loads of amazing information available here for free (and it still is, if people would learn how to use the "search" function). Today, not so much. Just the same old people asking the same old questions OVER AND OVER AND OVER!
And with the emergence of social networks like Facebook and Twitter, the potential reach for affiliate marketers has increased significantly. Social networks are an affiliate marketer’s dream come true: they offer a constantly changing feed for which they can tailor their ads, as well as gain valuable remarketing data on shoppers’ habits. This is a relatively untapped market that is only going to continue to expand. So affiliates aren’t dead and gone; we’re right in front of you. You probably just don’t recognize us.
Another way to find this information is to do a simple Google search. For example, one could place the following phrase into Google Search:  “(product name) + affiliate program”. (Replace “product name” with the name of the product you are promoting.) There is an interesting chrome addon called Affilitizer is available which makes this process easy.

Once you’re signed up, complete your personal consultation interview. You’ll then get access to your own affiliate mentor plus our Academy training course. Here you can learn everything from how to build your first website through to optimising it for greater conversion rates, plus everything in-between. Written by our affiliate management team, the guides are in-depth and super helpful.
It can be very difficult when starting out to determine what is a legitimate opportunity and ethical way to build a business when there are so many companies and individuals out there that are operating in a way that is quite unethical. Glad I could offer you some clarity in respect to items to consider and scams to avoid when looking to get into affiliate marketing.
We have a wealth of brilliant articles on our website covering the many various aspects of affiliate marketing in depth, however, for those of you who are completely new to the concept, I’m going to go back to basics and explain in detail exactly what affiliate marketing is, what it takes to succeed and how you could become a successful affiliate marketer, too.

Adam Enfroy is the Affiliate Partnerships Manager at BigCommerce. With 10+ years of experience in digital marketing, ecommerce, SEO, web development, and selling online courses, he is passionate about leveraging the right strategic partnerships, content, and software to scale digital growth. Adam lives in Austin, TX and writes about building your online influence by scaling your content and affiliate marketing strategies on his blog.

Most affiliate programs are very good about payment and will offer you their payment schedule (ever week, every month, etc). There are very rare circumstances where they don’t end up paying you on the date they were supposed to and that should create need for alarm. Either they don’t have the resource system in place to be able to pay on time or they simply do not have the money.
There are people who are getting into the industry who can still make some good money with great content, a solid following and / or an angle or technology not yet matched. The market is growing every day. Competition does increase, but so do the opportunities. If you’re not ready and willing to put in the time or effort without seeing immediate return, affiliate marketing is probably not the best place to start. Thanks for your comments!
The best way to think about affiliate marketing is quality over quantity. There are a lot of small websites that will promote your product, but the key is finding a small number of partners that will deliver conversions. For example, an equity management services firm has over 20,000 affiliates in its system, but only about 25 affiliates generate 85 percent of revenue.
Many affiliate programs run with last-click attribution, where the affiliate receiving the last click before the sale gets 100% credit for the conversion. This is changing. With affiliate platforms providing new attribution models and reporting features, you are able to see a full-funnel, cross-channel view of how individual marketing tactics are working together. For example, you might see that a paid social campaign generated the first click, Affiliate X got click 2, and Affiliate Y got the last click. With this full picture, you can structure your affiliate commissions so that Affiliate X gets a percentage of the credit for the sale, even though they didn’t get the last click. 
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